Travel around

Have you travelled thousands of kilometres or at least dreamt of doing so, to find a very different reality from that of your own land? If so, why not? Our world is diverse, but you do not have to travel further than the extreme south-west of England to find the mysterious land of Cornwall. Travelling across Europe from east to west, you cannot travel any further directly west. It is the last stop until Canada.

Nowhere in Cornwall is more than half an hour’s drive from the sea, except at the height of summer when the roads to the coasts and along them can become quite busy, but even then, you are unlikely to need much longer. Inland there is the beautiful wild landscape of Bodmin Moor, unknown or overlooked by many visitors to the county of Cornwall. Cornwall is a narrow peninsula between two remarkably different coasts: the north and the south. The north coast is wild and rugged, deeply indented as is the south coast, but unlike the latter, it receives the full force of the Atlantic Ocean.

The weather is strongly influenced by the Atlantic, some might say almost exclusively, although this is not quite true. The wind almost always blows from the west, bringing frequent showers and often long spells of rainy weather, but sunshine figures are higher than in the rest of the country and it is rarely very cold. Even when there is snow and ice in most of the country, the Cornish coasts seldom have either. Extremes of heat and cold are unknown here. Temperatures above 25 degrees Centigrade are certainly quite unusual on the north coast, but a night with zero degrees is just as unusual. The mildness of the south coast allows orange and lemon trees to grow along the banks of the Falmouth Estuary. The same estuary, which penetrates deep inland, offers shelter to boats and ships when seas are tempestuous. In contrast, the north coast has seen waves of up to 23 metres high. Sailors do not dare to try and anchor their boats when Atlantic gales blow in their full fury. TO BE CONTINUED…

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